We've just finished a fantastic fortnight of school visits for the Food Glorious Food project with our visiting Ugandan headteacher, Asaph Gheno Were.Asaph leads one of DDE’s link schools, Kisoko Boys’ Primary School in Tororo (Eastern Uganda). He is responsible for over 1600 children. Asaph’s school is very special, because it has a huge and flourishing farm attached to it (mostly arable – though there are hens and goats too!) The school grows lots of crops to supply the school kitchen, such as maize, sim-sim (sesame), aubergine, tomatoes, pineapples and mangoes. They also nurture excess produce and ‘cash crops’ (like cotton), which are used to fund school resources like uniforms and textbooks. All the children work on the farm daily, and are expert gardeners.

We wanted to let our project schools here in England know about different, more sustainable ways of sourcing, producing and consuming food, and introduce them to a different culture. So during May, we spent 8 days in school, working with classes to learn all about Uganda, Asaph's school, and Ugandan food culture and growing practices.

We began our days with some Ugandan greetings. We learnt a little Dhopadhola (the main language of Asaph’s area), and some ways of saying ‘thank you’ or expressing your appreciation for something through your body: ‘giving flowers’, a ‘thunderclap’ or clicking and stamping. Most of the children thought they were much more fun than a boring round of applause!

Next we used eagle eyes and curious, critical minds to examine photographs and ask insightful questions about Asaph’s school. Did you know… each class has over 100 children, they have a completely democratically elected school council, and every child in the school works on the farm?!

We then learnt about traditional Ugandan crops, including how they are farmed, and tickled our tastebuds cooking some traditional 'posho and beans',. This is a meal comprised of maize porridge and a tomato-based bean stew. It received mixed receptions – but overall, most people liked it! Almost all the children were brave and tasted something new.

We looked at some Ugandan food diaries, and compared what the children there eat with what we eat here in the UK. At lunchtime, we were ably looked after by the students, who showed us their schools, classrooms, libraries and gardens – and introduced Asaph to some British playground games!

We also got our hands dirty making 'bag gardens': a glorified version of a gro-bag, made from a sugar sack, and featuring plants growing out of the top and sides of the bag. These are very common and popular in Uganda. They are kept on verandas / by kitchen doors, enabling families to have quick and easy access to fresh, healthy vegetables.

Over the course of the day, we compared what we were seeing, doing and learning about Uganda with our own food practices here in England. We mused upon what we could learn from Asaph’s school, and how this could help us to improve our own food habits.

We had a wonderful time bringing together Asaph with the Food Glorious Food schools. Plenty was learnt and enjoyed – by the pupils, and by Asaph himself, who intends to take what he has learnt from our schools back to his school.

More to come!

Welcome!

...to Exeter's Global Centre, the home of Devon Development Education.

01392 438811
dde@globalcentredevon.org.uk

Welcome!

...to Exeter's Global Centre, the home of Devon Development Education.

01392 438811
dde@globalcentredevon.org.uk